Research diary for my Master thesis project: From Efficiency to Engagement: Game Dynamics on the Social Web. Tim Koch-Grünberg, Aveiro, Portugal.
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Reading Notes: The Multifaceted Nature of Intrinsic Motivation (2/2)

Reading Notes: The Multifaceted Nature of Intrinsic Motivation (1/2)

Reading Notes: Acting with Technology (1)

Google Tech Talks

TED Talks

Dissertation project: influent authors

reading notes: Information Visualization and Interface Culture

reading notes: Designing for Collaboration and Communication

(Inter)acções abertas vs estruturadas

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Janeiro 2011

Novembro 2010

Outubro 2010

Setembro 2010

Quarta-feira, 17 de Novembro de 2010
Reading Notes: The Multifaceted Nature of Intrinsic Motivation (2/2)

This is a continuation from a previous post, where I started to write down a synthesis of Steven Reiss' paper "The Multifaceted Nature of Intrinsic Motivation". The author questions the concept of "intrinsic motivation". Intrinsic Motivation (or Motive) theory states that there is a special category of motives which, when pursued, provide satisfaction to the individual, without any external incentives. The action in itself is motivation enough. The author questions this point of view, stating that the various examples of intrinsic motives given don't share any common characteristics, proving that there is no ground on which to group different motivations together under that category. Instead, he defends a multifaceted view on motivation - there are many different motivations, without any global categories, and each and every motivation can serve as an "end-goal" in themself.

 


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publicado por tim às 19:58
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Domingo, 14 de Novembro de 2010
Reading Notes: The Multifaceted Nature of Intrinsic Motivation (1/2)

Reiss, Steven (2004): The Multifaceted Nature of Intrinsic Motivation: The Theory of 16 Basic Desires. Review of General Psychology, 8:3, 179-193.

 

Abstract: R. W. White (1959) proposed that certain motives, such as curiosity, autonomy, and play (called intrinsic motives, or IMs), have common characteristics that distinguish them from drives. The evidence  that mastery is common to IMs is anecdotal, not scientific. The assertion that “intrinsic enjoyment” is common to IMs exaggerates the significance of pleasure in human motivation and expresses the hedonistic fallacy of confusing consequence for cause. Nothing has been shown scientifically to be common to IMs that differentiates them from drives. An empirically testable theory of 16 basic desires is put forth based on psychometric research and subsequent behavior validation. The desires are largely unrelated to each other and may have different evolutionary histories.

 

Reiss on Intrinsic Motives

Reiss' Theory of 16 Basic Desires...

 


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publicado por tim às 14:11

Reading Notes: Acting with Technology (1)

Kaptelinin, Victor; Nardi, Bonnie (2006): Acting with Technology. Activity Theory and Interaction Design. The MIT Press.  (amazon)

 

Chapter 3.2 - The Concept of Activity: Bridging the Gap between the Subjective and the Objective (pp. 29-35)

Chapter 3.4 - The Development of the Mind


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publicado por tim às 12:34

Quarta-feira, 10 de Novembro de 2010
Google Tech Talks

Google Tech Talks usually focus on a specific subject and go into more details than TED Talks. This has its drawbacks, since the message gets spread over almost an hour instead of TED's concise 15 minutes. Anyway, there are some very interesting Google Tech Talks out there. Here, I listed some of those that are relevant to my project.

 

Amy Jo Kim: Putting The Fun in Functional

 

 

 

Gabe Zicherman: Fun is the Future - Mastering Gamification

 

 

Games Everywhere

 

 

Building Web Reputation Systems

 

 

Tom Chatfield: Fun, Inc.

 

 

Building a Javascript-based Game Engine for the Web

 

 

Boardgame Design

 

 

Cooperation and Engagement: What can boardgames teach us?

 


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publicado por tim às 14:07

TED Talks

TED Talks are the Interweb's favorite source of inspiration, and for a reason: they are awesome. Here, I'll share a few I think are relevant to my project: understanding the social web, understanding games, understanding what motivates us on both and joining this knowledge for new, combined approaches towards designing both.

 

Dan Pink on the surprising science of motivation 

 

Jane McGonigal: Gaming can make a better World

 

 

Jesse Schell: When Games invade Real Life

(included in TED's best of the web list)

 

Howard Rheingold on Collaboration

 

 

David Perry: Are Games better than Life?

(thanks to LPedro)

 

 

Tom Chatfield: 7 Ways Games reward the Brain

 

 

Seth Priebatsch: The Game Layer on Top of The World

 

 

Stuart Brown says Play is more than Fun

 

 

Scott Kim takes apart the Art of Puzzles 


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publicado por tim às 12:32

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